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What is it that makes us call someone friend? 

Does it have anything to do with the length of time we have known them or how often we are around them? Or is more of a kindred spirit kind of thing?

Terry Brown was a friend. He ordered a saddle from me several years ago and we have stayed in touch ever since. I invited him to join a board where a bunch of cowboys, buckaroo’s and those who like them, choose to visit via the internet. He joined and always added much to any discussion, whether serious or just poking fun at each other and at our selves. 

From what Terry wrote on there, I got to know him well. And we talked on the phone at least every couple months. He was a very patriotic American and strong in his views and beliefs. We tried to make a deal for him to bring some cattle up here and sell them as the prices weren’t as good in Texas where he lived as they were up north in South Dakota. It never happened as prices for his cattle rose down south and fuel kept going up. We both regretted not getting the chance to shake hands and get to visit face to fazce. But we were still friends. 

His sister in law called me this morning to tell me he had been killed in an auto accident on Saturday. You could have knocked me over with a feather.

I am amazed at the feelings of sadness over this loss of a person who I knew, yet had never met face to face. I don’t know if that is a good thing or a bad thing, but I do know this is a sharp reminder to see and visit with my other friends and loved ones.

Life is short. Say what needs to be said and see those who will one day be gone and you will curse because they left a hole in your life.

 

So long Terry. Hope your ridin’ a good horse in tall grass with your beloved Longhorn cattle around you. Hopefully I will see you down the trail someday. You were truly a man!

Or any of the rest of you who want to laugh.

 

http://curmudgeonisms.blogspot.com/

 

Check it out. I would caution you, he uses some words some of you might find offensive.

http://www.aws.vcn.com/env.html

Go check this out.

http://powell.blogtownhall.com/default.aspx

They are buddies!

Sunrise 6/25/08

Got up early the last couple days. Went and helped a guy brand yesterday and went and moved some cattle in the breaks today

For some reason this site has changed the way I put pictures in. Sure, just about the time I get things figured out, they change them!

George W.’s War

No one likes war. War is a horrific affair, bloody and expensive. Sending our men and women into battle to perhaps die or be maimed is an unconscionable thought.



Yet some wars need to be waged, and someone needs to lead. The citizenry and Congress are often ambivalent or largely opposed to any given war. It’s up to our leader to convince them. That’s why we call the leader “Commander in Chief.”

 

George W.’s war was no different. There was lots of resistance to it. Many in Congress were vehemently against the idea. The Commander in Chief had to lobby for legislative approval.

Along with supporters, George W. used the force of his convictions, the power of his title and every ounce of moral suasion he could muster to rally support. He had to assure Congress and the public that the war was morally justified, winnable and affordable. Congress eventually came around and voted overwhelmingly to wage war.

George W. then lobbied foreign governments for support. But in the end, only one European nation helped us. The rest of the world sat on its hands and watched.

After a few quick victories, things started to go bad. There were many dark days when all the news was discouraging. Casualties began to mount. It became obvious that our forces were too small. Congress began to drag its feet about funding the effort.

Many who had voted to support the war just a few years earlier were beginning to speak against it and accuse the Commander in Chief of misleading them. Many critics began to call him incompetent, an idiot and even a liar. Journalists joined the negative chorus with a vengeance.

As the war entered its fourth year, the public began to grow weary of the conflict and the casualties. George W.’s popularity plummeted. Yet through it all, he stood firm, supporting the troops and endorsing the struggle.

Without his unwavering support, the war would have surely ended, then and there, in overwhelming and total defeat.

At this darkest of times, he began to make some changes. More troops were added and trained. Some advisers were shuffled, and new generals installed.

Then, unexpectedly and gradually, things began to improve. Now it was the enemy that appeared to be growing weary of the lengthy conflict and losing support. Victories began to come, and hope returned.

Many critics in Congress and the press said the improvements were just George W.’s good luck. The progress, they said, would be temporary. He knew, however, that in warfare good fortune counts.

Then, in the unlikeliest of circumstances and perhaps the most historic example of military luck, the enemy blundered and was resoundingly defeated. After six long years of war, the Commander in Chief basked in a most hard-fought victory.

So on that historic day, Oct. 19, 1781, in a place called Yorktown, a satisfied George Washington sat upon his beautiful white horse and accepted the surrender of Lord Cornwallis, effectively ending the Revolutionary War.

 

And I found this interesting also.

Your Social Security

Franklin Roosevelt, a Democrat, introduced the Social Security (FICA) Program. He promised:

1.) That participation in the Program would be Completely voluntary,

2.) That the participants would only have to pay 1% of the first $1,400 of their annual Incomes into the Program,

3.) That the money the participants elected to put into the Program would be deductible from their income for tax purposes each year,

4.) That the money the participants put into the independent ‘Trust Fund’ rather than into the general operating fund, and therefore, would only be used to fund the Social Security Retirement Program, and no other Government program, and,

5.) That the annuity payments to the retirees would never be taxed as income.

Since many of us have paid into FICA for years and are now receiving a Social Security check every month — and then finding that we are getting taxed on 85% of the money we paid to the Federal government to ‘put away’ — you may be interested in the following:

————————————————————-

Q: Which Political Party took Social Security from the independent ‘Trust Fund’ and put it into the general fund so that Congress could spend it?

A: It was Lyndon Johnson and the democrat controlled House and Senate.

——————————————————————–

Q: Which Political Party eliminated the income tax deduction for Social Security (FICA) withholding?

A: The Democrat Party.

———————————————————————–

Q: Which Political Party started taxing Social Security annuities?

A: The Democrat Party, with Al Gore casting the ‘tie-breaking’ deciding vote as President of the Senate, while he was Vice President of the US.

———————————————–
Q: Which Political Party decided to start giving annuity payments to immigrants?

AND MY FAVORITE:

A: That’s right! Jimmy Carter and the Democrat Party.
immigrants moved into this country, and at age 65, began to receive Social Security payments! The Democratic Party gave these payments to them, even though they never paid a dime into it!
————————————————————— 

Then, after violating the original contract (FICA), the Democrats turn around and tell you that the Republicans want to take your Social Security away!

Anyone surprised? I’m not.

Look at all the roses now!

And look at this pretty little flower that grows wild in the pasture. Spiderwort bracken or something like that I believe.

And then these also.

Jim and family are going to be here on the afternoon/evening of the 29th of June. Anyone who would like to meet him and said family, come over. We will set around a fire and play guitars and maybe burn some beef and drink some adult refreshments. Oh, Jim is the brains behind Yield and Overcome which is on the left side of the screen on my blogroll. Hopefully Hubba, of Hubba’s House fame, will join us also with his guitar and maybe some of his family. We will sure have fun!

These were growing up next to where grampa and gramma’s house was. They were dying out from all the livestock around them, I guess, plus they were getting pretty old. I scooped out a hole with the loader bucket and then scooped them up and brought them down here. I filled it all with old rotted manure. This was about 3 years ago. They have really took ahold and are starting to spread out. I keep throwing rocks around them. Hope they keep it up.

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